Teaching How to quickly provision a Dev Kubernetes Environment locally or in Oracle Cloud

This time last year, people were excited talking about technologies such as Mesos or Docker Swarm to orchestrate their Docker containers. Now days (April 2018) almost everybody is talking about Kubernetes instead. This proves how quickly technology is moving, but also it shows that Kubernetes has been endorsed and backed up by the Cloud Giants, including AWS, Oracle, Azure, (obviously Google), etc.

At this point, I don’t see Kubernetes going anywhere in the coming years. On the contrary, I strongly believe that it is going to become the default way to dockerise environments, especially now that it is becoming a PaaS offering with different cloud providers, e.g. Oracle Containers. This is giving the extra push to easily operate in enterprise mission critical solutions, having the backup of a big Cloud Vendor.

So, if you have not yet got familiar with Kubernetes, you better do so and quickly. In this blog I am going to show you how to get started with a fully functional Kubernetes dev environment that will let you start playing with it. In future blogs I am going to explain different use cases using Kubernetes, mainly around the 12-factor principles of microservices, e.g. including deploying applications with concurrency, managing load balancers, managing replication controller, scalability, managing state post-container restarts, etc… But let’s start with the first and most important 12-factor: “Disposability”.

In this blog, you don’t have to install Kubernetes manually if you don’t want to. I am going to explain 3 different ways in which you can get started with a Kubernetes Dev environment ready to go:

Continue reading “Teaching How to quickly provision a Dev Kubernetes Environment locally or in Oracle Cloud”

Teaching How to use Terraform to automate Provisioning of Oracle API Platform

Previously, I showed how to use Terraform and PSM CLI to spin up a “Build Server” and use it to provision Oracle Integration Cloud (OIC) environments. You can find this blog here.

In this blog I am going to show you how to do the same, but to provision Oracle API Platform environments.

The approach that I will be following is the same:

Continue reading “Teaching How to use Terraform to automate Provisioning of Oracle API Platform”

Teaching How to use Terraform to automate Provisioning of Oracle Integration Cloud (OIC)

In a previous blog, I explained how to treat your Infrastructure as Code by using technologies such as Vagrant and Terraform in order to help automate provisioning and decommissioning of environments in the cloud. Then, I evolved those concepts with this other blog, where I explained how to use Oracle PaaS Service Manager (PSM) CLI in order to provision Oracle PaaS Services into the Cloud.

In this blog, I am going to put together both concepts and show how simply you can automate the provisioning of Oracle Integration Cloud with Terraform and PSM CLI together.

To provision a new PaaS environment, I first create a “Build Server” in the cloud or as my boss calls it a “cockpit” that brings all the required bells and whistles (e.g. Terraform, PSM CLI, GIT, etc) to provision PaaS environments. I will add all the tooling it requires as part of its bootstrap process. To create the “Build Server” in the first place, I am using Vagrant + Terraform as well, just because I need a common place to start and these tools highly simplify my life. Also, this way, I can also treat my “Build Server” as “infrastructure as code” and I can easily get rid of it after I built my target PaaS environments and save with that some bucks in the cloud consumption model.

Once I build my “Build Server”, I will then simply git clone a repository that contains my scripts to provision other PaaS environments, setup my environment variables and type “terraform apply”. Yes, as simple as that!

This is a graphical view of what I will be doing:

Continue reading “Teaching How to use Terraform to automate Provisioning of Oracle Integration Cloud (OIC)”

Teaching How to use Oracle Load Balancer as a Service (LBaaS) to front end your APIs

In this blog, I am going to show you how to configure Oracle Load Balancer as a Service (LBaaS) to proxy/redirect traffic into multiple APIs. For the sake of this example, I am going to point to running APIs hosted on my Oracle API Gateway, as well as running on a 3rd party Cloud provider. However, you can use Oracle LBaaS to proxy traffic to any HTTP or HTTPS endpoint(s).

In this example, I am going to consume an existing API that I built some time ago that when invoked returns a random joke. In order to test it in high availability mode, I am also going to configure yet another “jokes” API that will serve as a redundant backend endpoint/API.

This is the high-level view of how Oracle LBaaS can easily enable multiple proxy/redirections to backend APIs hosted across various places:

Continue reading “Teaching How to use Oracle Load Balancer as a Service (LBaaS) to front end your APIs”

Teaching How to use Terraform to Manage Oracle Cloud Infrastructure as Code

Infrastructure as Code is becoming very popular. It allows you to describe a complete blueprint of a datacentre using a high-level configuration syntax, that can be versioned and script-automated. This brings huge improvements in the efficiency and reliability of provisioning and retiring environments.

Terraform is a tool that helps automate such environment provisioning. It lets you define in a descriptor file, all the characteristics of a target environment. Then, it lets you fully manage its life-cycle, including provisioning, configuration, state compliance, scalability, auditability, retirement, etc.

Terraform can seamlessly work with major cloud vendors, including Oracle, AWS, MS Azure, Google, etc. In this blog, I am going to show you how simple it is to use it to automate the provisioning of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure from your own laptop/PC. For this, we are going to use Vagrant on top of VirtualBox to virtualise a Linux environment to then run Terraform on top, so that it doesn’t matter what OS you use, you can quickly get started.

This is the high-level idea:

Continue reading “Teaching How to use Terraform to Manage Oracle Cloud Infrastructure as Code”

Teaching how to use Vagrant to simplify building local Dev and Test environments

The adoption of Cloud and modern software automation, provisioning and delivery techniques, are also requiring a much faster way to simplify the creation and disposal of Dev and Test environments. A typical lifespan of a Dev environment can go from minutes to just a few days and that’s it, we don’t need it anymore.

Regardless of whether you use a Windows, Apple or Linux based PC/laptop, virtualisation of environments via Virtual Machines, help with this problem, besides it leaves your host OS clean. Vagrant takes VMs to the next level, by offering a very simple, lightweight and elegant solution to simplify such Virtual Machine life-cycle management, easy way to bootstrap your software/libraries requirements and sharing files across your host and guest machines.

In this blog I am going to show you how to get started with Vagrant. You will find it a very useful to quickly create and destroy virtual environments that help you develop and test your applications, demystify a particular topic, connecting to cloud providers, run scripts, etc.

For example, typical scenarios I use Vagrant for include: Dev and Test my NodeJS Applications, deploy and test my Applications on Kubernetes, run shell scripts, SDKs, use CLIs to interact with Cloud providers e.g. Oracle, AWS, Azure, Google, etc. All of this from my personal laptop, without worrying about side effects, i.e. if I break it, I can simply dispose the VM and start fresh.

I can assure you that once you give it a go, you will find it hard to live without it. So, let’s wait no more…

Continue reading “Teaching how to use Vagrant to simplify building local Dev and Test environments”

Exploring GitHub Docker Hub and OCCS Part 4

In my previous post in this series I covered linking GitHub and DockerHub and configuring the environment such that a build of a Docker image was triggered on updates to GitHub. In this final post of the series I will take you through the steps to pull the image from Docker Hub into OCCS in order to run the application. It should be noted that the image built on Docker Hub in my example is only the web tier that contains my Node.js project (APIs and SwaggerUI). The MongoDB component of my OCCS Stack is pulled directly from Docker Hub when my Stack containing the Web Tier and Database Tier services is deployed to OCCS. Continue reading “Exploring GitHub Docker Hub and OCCS Part 4”