Manage Custom Fields in NetSuite using Oracle Integration Cloud NetSuite Adapter

Customization is essential part of any SaaS implementation to capture unique business needs. In NetSuite SaaS application also, there could be several use-cases where user might need to create a new Custom Object or add custom fields into existing Standard Object such as Contact, Account and Organization etc. In this blog I will be showing how can we add Custom fields e.g. Degree name and Passing Year etc. into existing NetSuite Contact object and can update the same field using Oracle Integration Cloud (OIC) NetSuite adapter.

Please Note: NetSuite Adapter handles the Custom fields in very different way in compare to other adapters. Due to NetSuite API limitation, OIC Adapters not able to discovers Custom fields created in NetSuite which could be concern to many Customers. However, Oracle NetSuite Integration Adapter provide a way to specify manually all those Custom fields using InternalId and ScriptId and assign associated values coming from Source System to those fields and that’s the core objective of writing this blog to show to reader how we can manually add and assign values to NetSuite Custom fields using OIC NetSuite Adapter. 

The use case scenarios –

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Below are the high level steps user need to perform to achieve outcome.

  • NetSuite – Create Custom Entity fields in NetSuite for Contact object
  • OIC – Create NetSuite Adapter connection as Target System
  • OIC – Create REST Connection as Source System
  • OIC- Workout Request Response Payload for REST Adapter Input
  • OIC – Create Integration, do mapping and Activate Integration
  • OIC – Test Integration using POSTMAN
  • NetSuite – Verify Contact object details

Continue reading “Manage Custom Fields in NetSuite using Oracle Integration Cloud NetSuite Adapter”

OMC Custom Metric – empowering custom monitoring

Sometimes it is necessary to monitor specific processes that are not in the provided OMC processes list and this is where CUSTOM METRIC come into the scene.

In this short post I will show how to create a CUSTOM METRIC and ALERT RULE to manage it.

So the challenge of the day: Monitor custom windows / linux  process and if it stops giving signs of life alert to the support group.

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Multitenant Common Users Accessing Application Tables in PDBs

I recently had a requirement where the Common User in a Multitenant DB environment wanted to access application tables across Pluggable Databases (PDBs) but at the same time access dictionary views across all PDBs without the need to manually switch between containers. 

This was because I had to setup a monitoring user account to monitor all PDBs performance as well as application workload.

In this example I will show you how the Common User (created at CDB level) can be configured to access the application tables (create at PDB level)

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OCI – Remote Peering 2 Virtual Cloud Networks across different Regions

In a previous blog, I explained how to local peer two Virtual Cloud Networks (VCNs) located in the same Region. In this blog, I am going to show you how you can remote peer two VCNs located in different Regions. You might want to use this approach for High Availability or Disaster Recovery scenarios or simply to interconnect private workloads across multiple regions. In order to remote peering 2 VCNs, we are going to use a new type of Networking Gateway in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, called Dynamic Routing Gateway (DRG). It is important to mention that the communication between the 2 regions does not route over the Internet, but via a dedicated network pre-established private fast connection/backbone, so the communication is secured and low latency. Just for the record, DRGs are the same type of gateways that you would use to establish connectivity between any other Data centres (e.g. on-premise DC or other Cloud providers, e.g. AWS, MS Azure, GCP), as well as to establish IPsec VPN connections or during a dedicated Fast Connect Private Peering communication, but that would be another blog.

For this demo, we are going to connect workloads between Phoenix and Ashburn. Each region will have its own VCN and within each VCN we are going to deploy a private subnet with 1 Linux VM, used to test the inter-communication across the regions.

For the purpose of this demonstration, I am going to show how to:

  1. Attach and configure DRG to each of your VCNs, located in different regions and establish the remote peering.
  2. Configure 2 private VMs, each in a different VCNs (different AD)
  3. Use public bastion host to connect to 1 of the private VMs and then confirm connectivity into the other private VM (cross-region connectivity).

This is a high-level visual representation:

Ok, let’s have fun!!!

Continue reading “OCI – Remote Peering 2 Virtual Cloud Networks across different Regions”

Enabling REST APIs to consume data from Oracle Autonomous Databases (ADW/ATP)

In a previous blog, I showed how to develop microservices to connect to Autonomous Databases and consume data (read/write) via REST APIs. Although I still highly recommend that approach, the reality is that there is an easier way to do it using Oracle REST Data Services modules that come included with any Oracle Autonomous Database (ADW/ATP).

This way you simply have to:

  1. Configure the API endpoint (Method + URL) that you want to expose as a REST API
  2. Define the underlying SQL statement that will serve to your endpoint (i.e. SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE statements or a more complex PL/SQL script)
  3. Define the security mechanism to properly protect your APIs

That’s pretty much it, this should be a very quick, yet powerful alternative to building your own microservices to consume data from Autonomous DBs.

Continue reading “Enabling REST APIs to consume data from Oracle Autonomous Databases (ADW/ATP)”

Calling OCI APIs from Postman

Oracle’s Cloud Infrastructure has been designed in an API-first manner, which is awesome for all sorts of infrastructure automation tasks. It also implements an interesting API security model, in which all requests must be signed using a private key, associated with a public key which has already been configured in OCI (here, the developers are showing their infrastructure roots, as this echoes how SSH Auth is normally handled). The documentation of this model provides sample code in a number of languages, which is perfect if you are writing automation scripts, but is a little inflexible for ad-hoc testing. Typically I much prefer to use a rich graphical REST client, such a Postman, so that I can easily tweak my parameters and try out different types of calls before I write any code. Unfortunately while Postman is well equipped for Basic and Token based Auth, HTTP-Signature is not natively implemented, and rather than abandon Postman for a new tool, I set out to implement it using Postman’s powerful scripting capabilities. In this blog post I provide the result of this, which is a downloadable collection which provides all of the required scripts, and discuss the approach used.

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OCI – Local Peering 2 Virtual Cloud Networks across different Availability Domains in the same region

In a previous blog, I explained how to get started with Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Networking primitives to allow Internet traffic into your Virtual Cloud Network. In this blog, I will show you how to peer 2 different Virtual Cloud Networks (VCNs), using VMs across different Availability Domains (AD) in the same region. For this, we are going to use a new type of OCI Networking Gateway, called Local Peering Gateway (LPG).

In Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, VCN are regional and subnets can be configured as regional resources too. This means that they can span across multiple Availability Domains within the same region (normally 3 ADs per region). For this demo, we are going to provision a private VM in a different Availability Domain (AD), each in a different VCN, so that we can make sure that we can establish connectivity across 2 VMs located in different VCNS and Ads, via the Local Peering

For the purpose of this demonstration, I am going to show how to:

  1. Attach LPG to each of your VCNs in the same region and establish the local peering.
  2. Configure 2 private VMs, each in a different VCNs (different AD)
  3. Use public bastion host to connect to 1 of the private VMs and then confirm connectivity into the other private VM.

This is a high-level visual representation:

Ok, let’s have fun!!!

Continue reading “OCI – Local Peering 2 Virtual Cloud Networks across different Availability Domains in the same region”