Learn how Containers and Kubernetes fit together – Live Workshop

Need to understand how Containers, Kubernetes and the Cloud-Native Landscape fit together?

Organisations are excited about the cloud-native approach as it helps provide parity between development and production environments, adoption of the DevOps framework, and enables software developers to build great products faster.

This new paradigm in application delivery has brought with it much new jargon and tooling – “Containers”, “Docker”, “Kubernetes”, “Container Orchestration”, and “Microservices” are fast becoming the new norm.

Save time and get up to speed on the business value and technical know-how of these contemporary, cloud-native concepts and tools, including:

  • CNCF Landscape
  • Containers
  • Docker
  • Kubernetes
  • Microservices

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Teaching How to Get started with Kubernetes deploying a Hello World App

In a previous blog, I explained how to provision a new Kubernetes environment locally on physical or virtual machines, as well as remotely in the Oracle Public Cloud. In this workshop, I am going to show how to get started by deploying and running a Hello World NodeJS application into it.

There are a few moving parts involved in this exercise:

  • Using an Ubuntu Vagrant box, I’ll ask you to git clone a “Hello World NodeJS App”. It will come with its Dockerfile to be easily imaged/containerised.
  • Then, you will Docker build your app and push the image into Docker Hub.
  • Finally, I’ll ask you to go into your Kubernetes cluster, git clone a repo with a sample Pod definition and run it on your Kubernetes cluster.

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Teaching How to quickly provision a Dev Kubernetes Environment locally or in Oracle Cloud

This time last year, people were excited talking about technologies such as Mesos or Docker Swarm to orchestrate their Docker containers. Now days (April 2018) almost everybody is talking about Kubernetes instead. This proves how quickly technology is moving, but also it shows that Kubernetes has been endorsed and backed up by the Cloud Giants, including AWS, Oracle, Azure, (obviously Google), etc.

At this point, I don’t see Kubernetes going anywhere in the coming years. On the contrary, I strongly believe that it is going to become the default way to dockerise environments, especially now that it is becoming a PaaS offering with different cloud providers, e.g. Oracle Containers. This is giving the extra push to easily operate in enterprise mission critical solutions, having the backup of a big Cloud Vendor.

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Your Place or Ours

Sometimes you just want to build a local environment on your own equipment simply because it’s quick and easy. But you soon realise that other people need access and resources get a bit tight (memory, CPU, etc). That’s when it makes sense to move it from your place into the cloud.

Just recently I realised how useful Oracle Virtual Box’s new export feature is for migrating local VMs into Oracle Public Cloud Infrastructure – Compute Classic. Oracle Virtual Box’s new export formats give me the ability to easily migrate Images to the Oracle Public Cloud where I can scale my environments as required.

Earlier this week I was building a new Oracle Identity and Access Management development environment on my laptop. This worked well from an initial build and configure perspective but there comes a time when I need to make this environment available to my Developers, Testers and other stakeholders. Running this image continuously on my laptop quickly becomes impractical even for development teams.

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Teaching How to use Terraform to automate Provisioning of Oracle API Platform

Previously, I showed how to use Terraform and PSM CLI to spin up a “Build Server” and use it to provision Oracle Integration Cloud (OIC) environments. You can find this blog here.

In this blog I am going to show you how to do the same, but to provision Oracle API Platform environments.

The approach that I will be following is the same:

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Teaching How to use Terraform to automate Provisioning of Oracle Integration Cloud (OIC)

In a previous blog, I explained how to treat your Infrastructure as Code by using technologies such as Vagrant and Terraform in order to help automate provisioning and decommissioning of environments in the cloud. Then, I evolved those concepts with this other blog, where I explained how to use Oracle PaaS Service Manager (PSM) CLI in order to provision Oracle PaaS Services into the Cloud.

In this blog, I am going to put together both concepts and show how simply you can automate the provisioning of Oracle Integration Cloud with Terraform and PSM CLI together.

To provision a new PaaS environment, I first create a “Build Server” in the cloud or as my boss calls it a “cockpit” that brings all the required bells and whistles (e.g. Terraform, PSM CLI, GIT, etc) to provision PaaS environments. I will add all the tooling it requires as part of its bootstrap process. To create the “Build Server” in the first place, I am using Vagrant + Terraform as well, just because I need a common place to start and these tools highly simplify my life. Also, this way, I can also treat my “Build Server” as “infrastructure as code” and I can easily get rid of it after I built my target PaaS environments and save with that some bucks in the cloud consumption model.

Once I build my “Build Server”, I will then simply git clone a repository that contains my scripts to provision other PaaS environments, setup my environment variables and type “terraform apply”. Yes, as simple as that!

This is a graphical view of what I will be doing:

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Teaching How to use Oracle Load Balancer as a Service (LBaaS) to front end your APIs

In this blog, I am going to show you how to configure Oracle Load Balancer as a Service (LBaaS) to proxy/redirect traffic into multiple APIs. For the sake of this example, I am going to point to running APIs hosted on my Oracle API Gateway, as well as running on a 3rd party Cloud provider. However, you can use Oracle LBaaS to proxy traffic to any HTTP or HTTPS endpoint(s).

In this example, I am going to consume an existing API that I built some time ago that when invoked returns a random joke. In order to test it in high availability mode, I am also going to configure yet another “jokes” API that will serve as a redundant backend endpoint/API.

This is the high-level view of how Oracle LBaaS can easily enable multiple proxy/redirections to backend APIs hosted across various places:

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